September 29, 2012 marks the second annual 100 Thousand Poets for Change #100Tpc

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:

Three Girls Media & Marketing Inc.

(408) 871-0377

Emily Sidley, emilysidley@threegirlsmedia.com

Kate Barton, katebarton@threegirlsmedia.com

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Second Annual Worldwide Event

Includes Musicians and Poets Striving for Global Change

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This Year’s 100 Thousand Poets for Change Adds Musicians;

600 Events Planned in More Than 110 Countries

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Santa Rosa, Calif. (July XX, 2012) – September 29, 2012 marks the second annual 100 Thousand Poets for Change, an event that brings poets, artists and musicians (new this year) around the world together to call for environmental, social, and political change. Voices will be heard globally through concerts, readings, workshops, flash mobs and demonstrations that each focus on their specific area of concern, within the framework of peace and sustainability, such as war, ecocide, racism and censorship.

“Peace and sustainability is a major concern worldwide, and the guiding principle for this global event,” said Michael Rothenberg, Co-Founder of 100 Thousand Poets for Change. “It’s amazing to see how many people have joined in around the world to speak out for causes they believe in, and to see so much heart and creativity expressed in their diverse approaches to this event.”

Participants are hoping, through their actions and events, to seize and redirect the political and social dialogue of the day and turn the narrative of civilization towards peace and sustainability. Those that want to get involved can visit www.100tpc.com to find or plan an event near them.

“This grass roots movement has arisen largely due to the impact of social media,” said Co-Founder Terri Carrion. “We’re really excited about the events we’ve got planned this year.”

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There are hundreds of activities planned in the United States alone, including:

  • ·A blues festival in New Orleans to help raise funds for medical care for aging musicians
  • ·A concert of Tibetan music and poetry hosted by 100 TPC Free Tibet in Pasadena
  • ·A concert in Nashville’s Centennial Park featuring major local musicians
  • ·An Occupy Wall Street poetry group will kickoff a weekend of events in New York City
  • ·An all day festival with multiple stages and over 50 poetry readings hosted by Beyond Baroque Cultural Center in Los Angeles
  • ·A three-day event in Santa Rosa (near San Francisco) that will live-stream events from around the world and feature live poetry readings, workshops and various styles of music and dance including hip hop, flamenco, African drums, reggae and more (more info in the “What Else” section below)
  • ·A 2 months (August & September) warm up readings all around Macedonia, covered cities as Tetovo, Kumanovo, Skopje, Shtip, Bitola.. and many more. Video poetry, acoustic music with readings, and the main event on 29 September, 2012 that will took place in Strumica [as last year] with workshops, projections, promotions and official poetry presentations with most of the important poets in the Macedonian nowadays, or lets say in the contemporary literature history in Macedonia.

Poetry and peace gatherings are also planned in strife-torn countries like Syria and Afghanistan as well. In Cairo and Alexandria, Egypt, poets, musicians and mimes will perform in public spaces and theaters. In Kingston, Jamaica an entire week of concerts, spoken word performances, lectures and workshops will address literacy issues in the country.

100 Thousand Poets for Change began in Sonoma County, Calif. The headquarters’ event will take place at the Arlene Francis Center in downtown Santa Rosa and will feature live poetry readings, workshops and various styles of music and dance including hip hop, flamenco, African drums, reggae and more. The event will also live-stream other 100 Thousand Poets for Change events worldwide and is sponsored by the Peace & Justice Center and Sonoma County Arts Council.

Immediately following September 29th, all documentation on the 100TPC.org website will be preserved by Stanford University in California, which recognized 100 Thousand Poets for Change in 2011 as an historical event, the largest poetry reading in history. They will continue to archive the complete contents of the website, 100TPC.org, as part of their digital archiving program LOCKSS.

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About 100 Thousand Poets for Change

Co-Founder Michael Rothenberg (walterblue@bigbridge.org) is a widely known poet, editor of the online literary magazine Bigbridge.org and an environmental activist based in Northern California. Co-Founder Terri Carrion is a poet, translator, photographer, and editor and visual designer for BigBridge.org

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100 Thousand Poets for Change

P.O. Box 870

Guerneville, Ca 95446

Phone: 305-753-4569

www.100TPC.org

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:a sense of wonder

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Interview with Ernesto Sábato

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:what I really like in my facebook friends, d real ones that I’ve met in Real too is that some of them are perfect sources for information.  I like d content that my friend Slobodan Nikolic [Serbian poet] shares on his profile and is connect with literature cause not very rare he wants to play some games on net. I’m sure that he’ll not share it on some other place/ blog or smt and cause it’s not my first time to steal from his content  [Sumatra and d explanation of Sumatra] I decide that this is d right place for this interview.  :)

:before he close his profile early in d day [hopefuly shortly] he shared this amazing interview from 1990 that I find pretty interesting for me and for my blog (readers) so voila’ if u’re one of them EnJoy! [1ox Slobo’]

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:a sense of wonder

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.Q: You  have  written  many  essays, notably  a  collection entitled Hombres y Engranajes  (1951;”Men and Gears”), on the dehumanizing  effects of science and  technology. How  did  a scientist like  yourself come to see things in this light?

A: Although I studied physics and mathematics, disciplines which  offered me a kind of abstract and ideal refuge in a “platonic paradise” far from the chaos of the world, I soon realized that the blind faith that some scientists have in “pure” thought, in reason and in Progress (usually with a capital “P“) made them overlook and even despise such essential aspects of human life as the unconscious and the myths which lie at the origin of artistic expression, in short, the “hidden” side of human nature. All that was missing in my purely scientific work – the Mr. Hyde that every Dr. Jekyll  needs if he is to be a complete individual – I found in German  romanticism  and, above all, in existentialism and surrealism. Lifting my eyes from my logarithms and sinusoids, I looked on the human face, from which I have never since looked away.

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Q: Some great contemporary  writers have managed to reconcile science and  creativity…

A: That may be so, but it does not lessen my belief that our era is strongly marked by the opposition between science and the humanities, which today has become irreconcilable. Since the Enlightenment  and the days of the Encyclopaedists, and above all since the advent of positivism, science has withdrawn to a kind of Olympian retreat, cut off from humanity. The absolute sovereignty of Science and Progress over the greater part of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has reduced the individual to the status of a cog in a gigantic machine. Capitalist and Marxist theorists alike have contributed to the propagation of this sadly distorted vision in which the individual is melted into the mass and the mystery of the soul is reduced to physically quantifiable emissions of radiation.

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Q: Yet,  even  in  the  nineteenth  century, there was a strong philosophical current that  questioned the  monumental rational edifice constructed by Hegel, the weight of which crushed the individual. We are thinking  of Kierkegaard, about whom  you have written extensively.

A: Kierkegaard was the first thinker to question whether science should take precedence over life and to answer firmly that life comes first. Since then, the object deified by science has been dislodged as the centre of the universe and been replaced  by  the  subject, the man of flesh and blood. This led on to Karl Jaspers and Martin Heidegger, to twentieth century existentialist philosophy in which man is no longer an “impartial” scientific observer but a “self” clothed in flesh, the “being destined to die” of whom I have written and who is the source of tragedy and  metaphysics, the highest forms of literary expression.

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Q: But not the only ones…

A: Of  course not,  but  to my  mind  they  are the most important  because of their tragic, transcendental dimension. One  has only  to think  of Dostoyevsky’s Notes from the Underground, that bloody diatribe in which, with almost demented  hatred, he denounced  the modern age and its cult of progress.

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Q: We are right into literature now…

A: Yes, because the novel can express things that are beyond the scope of philosophy or the essay such as our darkest uncertainties about God, destiny, the meaning of life, hope. The novel answers all these questions, not simply by expressing ideas, but through myth and symbol, by drawing on the magical properties of thought. All the same, many of the characters in novels are just as real as reality itself. Is Don Quixote “unreal”? If reality bears any relationship to durability, then this character born of Cervantes’ imagination is much more real than the objects that surround  us, for he is immortal.

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Q: So literature interprets reality?

A: Fortunately, art  and  poetry  have  never claimed to dissociate the rationaf from the irrational, the sensibility from the intellect, dream from reality. Dream, mythology and art have a common  source in the unconscious – they reveal a world which could have no other form of expression. It is absurd to ask artists to explain their work. Can you imagine Beethoven analysing his symphonies or Kafka explaining  what  he really  meant  in The Trial? The notion that everything can be “rationally”  explained is the hallmark of the Western positivist mentality typical of the modern age, an age which overestimates the value of science, reason and logic. Yet this form of culture represents only a brief moment in human history.

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Q: You  seem to consider our age to be the final phase in a line of modem thought beginning in the middle of the nineteenth century and ending in our own times.

A: Literary fashions should not be confused with the major trends of thought. In the vast and tragic movement of ideas there are advances and retreats, sideways excursions and counter-currents. It is clear, however, that we are witnessing the end of an era. We are living through a crisis of civilization in which there is a kind of confrontation between the eternal forces of passion and order, of pathos and ethos, of the Dionysian and the Apollonian.

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Q: Can this crisis be resolved?

A: The only way we can escape from this harrowing crisis is by snatching living, suffering man from the gigantic machine in which he is enmeshed and which is crushing him. But it must not be forgotten, at the dawn of a new millennium, that an age does not end at the same moment for everyone. In the nineteenth century, when Progress was triumphant, writers and thinkers such as Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard were not “of their time”, for already, despite the optimism of scientists, they had a presentiment of the catastrophe that was in store for us and which Kafka, Sartre and Camus were to portray.

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Q: Is that why  you reject the concept of ”progress” in art?

A: Art can no more progress than a dream can, and for the same reasons. Are the nightmares of our contemporaries any more advanced than those of the prophets of the Bible? We can say that Einstein’s mathematics are superior to those of Archimedes, but not that Joyce’s Ulysses is superior  to Homer’s Odyssey. One of Proust’s characters is convinced that Debussy is a better composer than Beethoven for the simple reason that he was born after him. There’s no need to be a musicologist   to appreciate Proust’s satirical irony in this passage. Every artist aspires towards  what may be called an absolute, or towards a fragment of the Absolute, with a capital “A”,  whether he be an Egyptian sculptor in the time of Ramses II, a Greek  artist of the classical age, or Donatello. This is why there is no progress in art, only change and new departures that are due not only to the sensibilities of each artist but also to the tacit or explicit vision of an epoch or a culture.  One  thing at least is certain; no arust is better placed than another to attain these absolute values simply  because he was born later.

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Q: So you do not believe that there can be a universal aesthetic?

A: The  relativity  of  history  is  reflected  in  aesthetics. Each period has a dominant value – religious,  economic or metaphysical – which colours all the others. In the eyes of the people of a religious culture preoccupied with the eternal, Ramses II’s hieratic and geometric colossus would encapsu­ late more “truth”  than  a totally  realistic statue. History shows us that beauty and truth change from one period to the next, that black culture and white culture are based on different criteria. The reputations of writers, artists and musicians are subject to swings of the pendulum.

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Q: There is no justification, therefore, for speaking of the superiority of one culture over another?

A: Today we have come a long way from conceited positivist certainties and from “enlightened  thought” in general. Following the work of Levy-Bruhl, who after forty years of research admitted in all honesty that he could see no “progression”  in  the  move from  magical to logical thought and that the two had inevitably to coexist in man, all cultures must be seen as deserving equal respect. We have finally come round to rendering justice to what were once condescendingly called “primitive cultures”.

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Q: You  are, nevertheless, dissatisfied with  the  education currently available  in  schools and universities. What do you think it lacks?

A: When I was young, I was made to swallow a mountain of facts that I forgot as quickly as I could. In geography, for example, I barely remember the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn, and perhaps that’s only because they are often mentioned in the newspapers. Someone once said that culture is what is left when you have forgotten everything else. For a human being, learning means taking part, discovering and inventing. If people are to advance, they must form their own opinions, even if, at times, this means making mistakes and having to go back to the beginning again. They need to explore new paths and experiment with new methods. Otherwise we shall, at best, merely produce a race of scholars or, at worst, of bookworms or of parrots regurgitating ready-made phrases from books. The book is a wonderful tool, provided that it does not become an obstacle that prevents us from pursuing our own research.

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Q: How do you see the educator’s role?

A: Etymologically speaking, to educate means to develop, to bring out what exists in embryonic  form, to realize potential. This “labour”, this delivery by the teacher is rarely fully accomplished, and this perhaps is the origin of all the faults of our education systems. Students must be made to ask themselves questions, and be convinced of their own ignorance and of ours, so that they are prepared not only to ask questions but to think  for themselves, even if they disagree with us. It is also very important  for them to be able to make mistakes and for us to accept questions and approaches that may seem odd. Given this state of mind, students will understand that reality is infinitely more complex and mysterious than the small area encompassed by our knowledge. Everything  else will follow automatically.  This is what  gives rise to questionings and to certainties, the mixture of tradition and innovation that constitutes the cultural dynamic. As Kant said, people should not be taught philosophy, they should be taught to philosophize. This is the method of Plato’s “Dialogues”, based on direct, spontaneous exchange, in the course of which questions emerge from our awareness of our fundamental ignorance.

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Q: Can  you give us a specific example?

A: A long time ago, I traveled through Patagonia in a jeep with  a forester  who  told  me  how  much  the  forest  was receding with each successive forest fire. He told me of the defensive role played by cypress trees, which he compared to the stoical heroes of an army rearguard since they sacrifice themselves to delay the spread of a fire and to protect the other  trees. This  made  me wonder  what  the teaching of geography could be like if it were linked to the struggle between species, the conquest of the oceans and of the continents, and to the history of mankind, which is pathetically dependent upon the terrestrial environment. In this way the pupil would get the idea of a true adventure, of a thrilling battle against the hostile forces of Nature and of history. Far from the dead weight of encyclopaedic knowledge, from dusty  volumes  and  ready-made ideas, knowledge  thus perpetually renewed would give each  pupil  the feeling of discovering  and  participating   in  an  age-old  story. For example, to engrave indelibly on students’ minds the complicated geography of the American continent,  as a lived­ through rather than a book-learned experience, would not the best way be to teach it through the adventures of great explorers such as Magellan or conquistadores such as Cortes? We should be formed, not informed. As Montaigne said, “Learning by heart is not learning”. What an exciting manual of geography and ethnology for teenagers Jules Verne’s Around  the World in Eighty Days would make! We have to kindle astonishment at the profound mysteries of the universe. Everything in the universe is astonishing if you think about it. But familiarity has made us blasé and nothing astonishes us any more. We have to rediscover a sense of wonder.

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Q: You even recommend “back to  front” teaching, starting with the present and reaching back into the past.

A: I believe that the best way to interest young people in literature is to start with contemporary authors, whose language and concerns are closer to the students’ own hopes and fears. Only later can they really become interested in what Homer or Cervantes wrote about love and death, hope and despair, solitude and heroism. The same could be done with  history  by tracing  back  to the  roots  of current problems. It is also a mistake to try to teach everything. Only a few key episodes and problems, enough to provide a structure, should be taught. Few books should be used, but they should be read with passion. This is the only way to avoid making reading seem like a walk through  a cemetery of dead words.  Reading  is only valid if it strikes a chord in the reader’s mind. There is a kind of pseudo-encyclopaedic teaching, invariably associated with book-learning, which is a form of death. As if there were no culture  before Gutenberg!

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Q: For years you have been pointing out the risks inherent in nuclear weapons, in the arms race and in ideological confrontation throughout the world. Aren’t the upheavals of recent years, and in particular of recent months, taking some of the  force out of this message?

A: I’m not so sure about that. First of all, the proliferation of nuclear weapons is a fact. Many countries already have their own atomic “mini-bombs” and a chain reaction starting with some irresponsible terrorist action cannot be discounted. But this is only the purely “physical”  aspect of the question,  monstrous though it is. What really worries me is the spiritual catastrophe facing our era, which is the sad outcome of the repression of the forces of the unconscious in contemporary society. I see evidence of this in the proliferation of all kinds of protesting minorities, as well as in our collective history. We live in an anguished, neurotic, unstable age, hence the frequency of psychosomatic disorders, the upsurge in violence and in the use of drugs. This is a philosophical rather than a police matter. Until quite recently the “peripheral” regions of the world were unaffected by this phenomenon. In the East for example, as  well  as  in Africa and in Oceania, mythological and philosophical traditions maintained a certain harmony between man and the world. The abrupt, unchecked irruption of Western values and technology has wreaked havoc, just as, during the Industrial Revolution, the mill-owners of Manchester swamped with their cheap cotton goods peoples who knew how to produce exquisite textiles. This mental catastrophe  is leading us towards a terrifying psychological and spiritual explosion which will give rise to a wave of suicides and scenes of hysteria and collective madness. Ancient  traditions  cannot  be replaced by the transistor industry.

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Q: Do you see nothing  positive in the balance-sheet?

A: Yes, perhaps, but frankly I suspect that I belong to a race that is on the road to extinction. I believe in art, dialogue, liberty and the dignity of the individual human being.  But  who is  interested in such  nonsense today? Dialogue has given way to insult and liberty to political prisons. What difference is there between a left-wing and a right-wing police state? As if there could be good or bad torturers!  I must be a reactionary because I still believe in dull, mediocre democracy, the only regime which, after all, allows one to think freely and to prepare the way for a better reality.

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Interview with Ernesto Sábato: A Sense Of Wonder, The UNESCO Courier, August 1990

:animate ur #poetry or just see this one! blue bird ~

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:I just saw this simple, naive animation that covers d lyrics  that d famous Bukowski wrote and name them as blue bird. follow d poem and d animation, I really like how they make this video.  slowly, not so perfect.. but still, fair enough good to spent this 2 minutes here and enjoy. trashy paper style, easy illustration, stop motion play and d words that even if u don’t read them, somehow u recognize them.

First I share with u d poem written by Charles Bukowski then d video, enjoy. .. happy Saturday ~

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There’s a bluebird in my heart

there’s a bluebird in my heart that
wants to get out
but I’m too tough for him,
I say, stay in there, I’m not going
to let anybody see
you.
there’s a bluebird in my heart that
wants to get out
but I pour whiskey on him and inhale
cigarette smoke
and the whores and the bartenders
and the grocery clerks
never know that
he’s
in there.

there’s a bluebird in my heart that
wants to get out
but I’m too tough for him,
I say,
stay down, do you want to mess
me up?
you want to screw up the
works?
you want to blow my book sales in
Europe?
there’s a bluebird in my heart that
wants to get out
but I’m too clever, I only let him out
at night sometimes
when everybody’s asleep.
I say, I know that you’re there,
so don’t be
sad.
then I put him back,
but he’s singing a little
in there, I haven’t quite let him
die
and we sleep together like
that
with our
secret pact
and it’s nice enough to
make a man
weep, but I don’t
weep, do
you?

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Animated Poem, Bluebird

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:d ocean resonates secret poems

2 Comments

[echoing across the pond]

Poem for Mitko
_Michael Rothenberg

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Today, when Ziggy
(the dog) and I
go down to the ocean
we’ll send you a poem

Some wild ribbon
Invisible soul
birds in flight
across chrome waters

We will wait
for your silent reply
Look for a word
and world of peace

Riding back
over bright breakers
from your land-
locked European country

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A Sea-Monkey
I was born and raised
in Florida

Learned my liquid life
Now, I am pulled
by the moon

Birth and inevitability
Yes, the ocean
gives us power

Tells us the rolling universe
does not belong to us
No matter how hard

we try to destroy it

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Godless power
Chrome waves

Sun’s flames
soak my brow

Ziggy stops to dig in the sand
Barks at the blue-black raven

calling from the stranded
boulder on Shell Beach

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I’d go crazy living on an island
surrounded by a fevered sea of woe

and sapphire horizons

I plan for a busier tomorrow
But I can’t get the ocean out of my head

You could crave another island

But whatever’s there I can’t describe
Lupine, thistle, and wild oats

on the bluff
Something I think I see, but can’t

Imagination
inscribed in the mercurial sky

I wait for an explosion

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This is not a good year for Tyrants!
Copper skies above Tahrir Square

Here comes that crashing thought
That currency I sent away over the expanse

to be read by you, Mitko
Tear gas clouds in Tahrir Square

Coming back tied and frayed around a rugged headland
We have had enough of this enslavement!

Men and women, boys and girls with stones
Give them what they want

Don’t wait for permission from the headquarters
Authorization from the Opera

Live long and without endorsements

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The dog still barks, but can’t say exactly what he believes
Is that a dragon or civilization burning on the beach?

Coming in or going out
I can’t tell which way the poetry is running

A wave followed by another wave followed by another
Tide of the underworld rushing overall, blowing silver

over shipwrecked shores and tortured skies
A sleeper wave slashing

Pillars of…

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I asked the California badger
on the road back home
Do you find this dream amusing?

There was something vicious in his response
Is the human condition just entertainment?

I ask the badger
about Political gamesmanship
and coppery metaphors

Slung across the heavens
like Handel’s Messiah?

No reply!

This is not a domestic animal!

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O, Brother from another great continent
Beyond shimmering cataclysmic fever

Foam and light rushing up over my feet
Mammoth rubbings on mammoth stones. . .

Oh Macedonian Brother

I went down to the ocean today and the sky and sun and water
were blinding and gorgeous chrome, so I kind of got caught

in light and isolation and could think of nothing else

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.OCEANia and :Christmas
_Mitko Gogov

.lips are touching salty waves,
oceans playin’ with d messages lost in them.
We think that inside float
maternal fluid which nourishes us while we sleep
as teddy bears, as kangaroos
in d
wombs
inside.

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We fly with our messages
like freed birds from their cage..
Love is transferred through cosmic channels!
..an uncle somewhere far across the pond
sit on the shore,
caressing the existence of his thoughts
sending them far away to me
to be returned as hidden universes.
The day ends ..

. .. and, somewhere there Jesus is born.

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dogs bark in joy,
about one I know for sure.
In these bottles we keep all
d messages, those which are yet to be sent
condemning the mystery of not knowing.

!Telepathy is a pact with mice. .. you hear me?

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We signalize d existence,
as fireflies in summer. .. even d Indians would envy us
for d art of connecting.
Do we hear each other or d waves are too strong?!
I hear how d water cleans our souls. these salty rocks
one day will fall apart!
We run lost as we should
win this marathon, but not
all waves end at the same place?

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Embraced each other with d thoughts that returns
– boomerang technique is more active nowadays.
The end of reason is near ,
in d rain we hide d cry of our fear.
At the end of the day

:all stars are falling down
– but they not fade;

they glow us from closer!

night lights,
they make d passion for more myth!

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We reserve space in d universe
as if d hotel of our life has remained with(out)
no rooms. Guests are our memories. ..

fill d beds and under them they hide Us
from ourselves..*

Here the lake is calm
..dreaming of its elder brothers and sisters
will there be a river born to bring me
at d sea,
will there be a sea born
to bring me to you?

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The Absolute dives with special equipment
we the trackers are dolphins
we close our snouts while we breathe,
yet, our ears fill with water .

Can we hear d water composition
for the rain, for d snow that melts in us
or icicles are born?

In my house a wave is coming,
from d ocean is, We say. ..
on my walls dark blue worlds
aquarium filled with indigo sky

.my fishes are dreaming d Big Water
Lemurians dears ~

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.all rights reserved. Michael Rothenberg & Mitko Gogov copyright © 2011

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_this is a project that I like to call meditation trough #poetry and it happen on d Christmas Eve’ when Michael sit on d ocean and sent his poetry trough d waves in my house where I receive d salty smell of d eternal life that we live.

Before I share d bio that I took from wikipedia I want to mention here that I become friend with him after he start d big poetry event 100 Thousand Poets for Change, that took place all over d world in one single day 24. September and I decide to make poetry event that will be part of d event and will be placed in my city as only manifestation that will support this IDEA and will sent signal, light from Strumica for more awareness in all fields. more about 100 TPC and Big Bridge [here]. if u are into poetry u can create d event for ur region for next year, it’s planned for 29 September – [join Us, write to us at: walterblue@bigbridge.org]

Michael Rothenberg is an American poet, songwriter, editor, and active environmentalist in the San Francisco Bay Area. Born in Miami Beach, Florida, Rothenberg received his Bachelor of Arts in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Afterward, he moved to California in 1976, where he began “Shelldance Nursery”, an orchid and bromeliad nursery.

In 1993 he received his MA in Poetics at New College of California. In 1989, Rothenberg and artist Nancy Davis began Big Bridge Press,[1] a fine print literary press, publishing works by Jim Harrison, Joanne Kyger, Allen Ginsberg, Philip Whalen and others. Rothenberg is editor of Big Bridge,[2] a webzine of poetry. Rothenberg is also co-editor and co-founder of Jack Magazine,[3] He is the editor of:

  • Overtime, Selected Poems by Philip Whalen
  • As Ever, Selected Poems by Joanne Kyger
  • David’s Copy, Selected Poems by David Meltzer
  • Way More West, Selected Poems by Ed Dorn (Penguin, 2007)
  • Collected Poems of Philip Whalen (Wesleyan University Press, 2007).

Rothenberg’s poems have appeared in 88: A Journal of Contemporary American Poetry, First Intensity, Cortland Review, Golden Handcuffs Review, Exquisite Corpse, Zyzzyva, Mudlark,[4] Jacket, Rolling Stock, Sycamore Review, and other publications. His books include Unhurried Vision, Paris Journals, What The Fish Saw, Nightmare Of The Violins, Man/Woman w/Joanne Kyger, and Favorite Songs. In 1990 Rothenberg began writing songs. His songs have appeared in films by Hollywood Pictures, Shadowhunter and Black Day, Blue Night.

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Mitko Gogov (1983, Skopje, Macedonia) aka kihuPotru is conceptual artist, published poet, youth worker & activist.

Conceptual/ multimedia artist (art academy, Bulgaria, non-formal educational art programs & workshops France ) with few expos, performances and art installations behind, showed in France, Norway, Italy, Serbia, Bulgaria, Macedonia.. published poet and short stories writer, translated in English [Philippines, Us.. ], Serbian, Croatian, Italian, Spanish, Indian [telugu], Bulgarian, Macedonian.. [still working on d first book that should be published February, 2o12]

youth worker that works with young people from everywhere, push for social inclusion and volunteering. .. active graffiti painter and word as a [dj] with the name Dzamski, specializing in psychedelic trance, dark forest, experimental and ambient sounds.
Blogger, open for communication. #culture #art #media

:Tomas Tranströmer _or d Nobel Prize IN Literature_o11

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Tomas Tranströmer

Born: 15 April 1931, Stockholm, Sweden

Residence at the time of the award: Sweden

Prize motivation: “because, through his condensed, translucent images, he gives us fresh access to reality”

That what I would like to mention on my blog is this year Nobel Prize in Literature 2011. One hour before the official annunciation of d awarded author on fb there where conversation between the Balkan literature circles that one of d nominated for d award is writer from Serbia. [fake info] probably because now we can read that besides d laureate 7/1, the 81-year-old Syrian poet known as Adonis at odds of 4/1 was second and Japan’s Haruki Murakami was third at 8/1.

Then we saw d first news like: The 2011 Nobel Prize in Literature is awarded to Tomas Tranströmerbecause, through his condensed, transluscent images, he gives us fresh access to reality“.

That what I found interesting today is the opinion that Timothy Byford (famous film director & friend of mine) shares on his personal web page:

I have to admit to never having read a single of Tranströmer’s poems before this week and am grateful to the Swedish Academy for drawing my attention to his poetry, which I find mystical, dreamlike and enigmatically subtle, prompting one to read them over and over again, every time discovering something new.

Apparently in Sweden he is known as a `buzzard poet` because his poetry views the world from a great height…like a buzzard.

While on Internet d people are separated in their opinions I decide that is good to read some poetry firstly then to try to create opinion. ..or to take a side.  .. I start with links  where we could read more about his works. The official link for d awarded author, also as post in guardian.uk, LA Times etc.

..more for HIM u’ll find @ poets.org or on HIS personal web page.

AFTER A DEATH
Once there was a shock
that left behind a long, shimmering comet tail.
It keeps us inside. It makes the TV pictures snowy.
It settles in cold drops on the telephone wires.

One can still go slowly on skis in the winter sun
through brush where a few leaves hang on.
They resemble pages torn from old telephone directories.
Names swallowed by the cold.

It is still beautiful to hear the heart beat
but often the shadow seems more real than the body.
The samurai looks insignificant
beside his armor of black dragon scales.

translated by Robert Bly

OUTSKIRTS

Men in overalls the same color as earth rise from a ditch.
It’s a transitional place, in stalemate, neither country nor city.
Construction cranes on the horizon want to take the big leap,
but the clocks are against it.
Concrete piping scattered around laps at the light with cold tongues.
Auto-body shops occupy old barns.
Stones throw shadows as sharp as objects on the moon surface.
And these sites keep on getting bigger
like the land bought with Judas’ silver: “a potter’s field for
burying strangers.”

translated by Robert Bly

Nikola Madzirov, poet from my city [very famous] in d last days shares on his facebook profile poetry from d awarded laureate so I decide to keep it for myself here. Tomas Tranströmer has been part of d Struga Poetry Evenings 2003 in Macedonia and awarded with d most important award “Golden Wreath“.

Томас Транстромер

ДРВОТО И НЕБОТО
Едно дрво се шета по дождот,
сè крај нас ќе мине во поројот сиво.
Има задача. Си зема живот од дождот
како сколовранец во овоштарник.

Штом дождот ќе запре и дрвото запира.
Се насетува исправено, мирно во јасните ноќи
и го чека, како и ние, моментот
кога снегулките расцутуваат во вселената.

Препев: Миодраг Станковски

ЕЛЕГИЈА
Ја отворам првата врата.
Голема сончева соба.
Тежок камион поминува по улицата
и го затресува порцеланот.

Ја отворам втората врата.
Пријатели! Пиевте мрак
и станавте видливи.

Врата број три. Тесна хотелска соба.
Поглед на споредна улица.
Отсјај на светилка врз асфалтот.
Убав отпад на искуството.

ЦРНИ ГОРИ

На следниот свиок автобусот се ослободи од студената планинска сенка
го сврте носот кон сонцето и тргна лазејќи и рикајќи пругоре.
Ние се туркавме во автобусот. Бистата на диктаторот беше исто така со нас свиткана во хартија од весник. Едно шише одеше од уста до уста.
Смртта, знакот на раѓањето, растеше со различна брзина кај сите.
Горе во планините синото море го стаса небото.

Препев: Миодраг Станковски

What about Con.Tempo.rary arT?

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In the wireless connection I found colors on the top of the TV. The youth in the box were speaking about art. Modern or contemporary?
If you still can’t find the difference between these two periods in the creative era don’t worry because the line between those is not very good defined, except that the artist in the contemporary period can use the telephone, video, TV, and all the modern technology we have now. In the modern period the artists still didn’t have some of those materials/ products.
If we are looking for the right definition about the word Contemporary we know that it means “art that has been and continues to be created during our lifetimes”. In other words, contemporary to us.
It is a period that started in the 60’s and the beginning of the 70’s. As we saw that after the postmodern there where still new things coming and the designers and artists show totally new ways of expressing themselves.
The difference in this last period of the evolution of art is that you can write on the paper and it is not necessary something to be written at all. It is also not necessary to be explained to the audience what does that mean. It’s all about the human eye and how it accepts these works of art. Usually nowadays we can find groups of artists gathered in community, creating conceptual stuff which are difficult to be explained and are observed only from small circles of people who are into art. Over the past 40 years we saw what kind of shapes and forms this period can create to evolve into today’s level where the reception of art is crystallized till moment of refinement.
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Every different period brings new waves in different fields of the normal day living. We live in      time when we wait for new application and upgrade of the old one everyday, when good commercial, advertisings and designs take our attention. We want to enter in objects that bring us new way of thinking and combine the elements and the knowledge from the classical ages till now. Exactly that is living in contemporary environment.
There are new lines in the forms of the architecture that starts building in the last 30 – 40 years, different relation with the theatre, painted art, photography, literature, movie and all other brunches of the art as a whole.

New forms were born like art installations, multi media, visual art etc. There are different issues with which the artist or the groups connect with, such as feminism, multiculturalism, globalization, bio-engineering and AIDS and cancer awareness. Most of the time, contemporary art is closely related to the modern, postmodern and avant-garde period of art. In today’s art, materials which are used in the creation of an art-work are collection of information that the materials carry by themselves and their combination is aimed to convey a specific thought / paragraph for a particular condition.

Ones of the best presenters of this period who border with the postmodern are Marina Abramovich (performance artist), Banksy (graffiti artist), Yoko Ono (musician, artist), Laurie Anderson (performance artist), Slaven Tolj (performance, installation artist), Richard Wilson (sculptor), Philip Pocock (internet and installation artist), Kenneth Noland  (painter), Charles Bukowski (writer, poet), Takashi Murakami (sculptor and painter), Santiago Calatrava (architect)  and so much more situated in a lot of different categories like feminist art, neo-conceptualism, neo-expressionism, multiculturalism, graffiti movement, neo-pop, futurism, minimalism and so on.
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Contemporary art is art in action. As a whole, it is very difficult to analyze it, mostly because of all those groups and subgroups in which artists define their expression. Groups create art that is engaged, which is protest or support of a political process, a revolt against a global problem, poverty, discrimination, gender inequality, environmental problems etc..


Nowadays, art is taking part of everything. When you buy products you choose those who have better form and design, on TV and internet we more often stay on some programs and pages that bring something unique and not seen before. The things that we can see in the galleries are based on deeper concept that is the main point on which we should put attention.
Contemporary artists are here to bring progressive ways of understanding the life like sustainable and innovative living with use of organic and recycled materials. When mother Earth is more respected, all her resources can be used in more creative way.
Everything what we do in present time can be seen as a contemporary way of living and the works that we produce can be seen as contemporary art. :)
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On this exchange we are going to talk about contemporary art and we will share our knowledge about art during this modern age of living. We are also going to discuss about the materials which are used by the present artists in order to create their works and what kind of message they bring.
There will be workshops where we will express our ideas via all those different ways.
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POWER OF ARTTOGETHER

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Illustration Of The Word

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When I want to write long sentences
I always begin to think that
from an ordinary rain
I would like to make a storm.

In the time when I want to
raise myself into few words,
I think of you and then
I have no enough paper and ink
to describe just your hair.

I slip sometimes with the mind
like wine which slowly
becomes part of each body and
touches the brain like every drop of blood.

In the life of the unwritten words
only the book cover has an illustration
of the everlasting spring hidden
under the blanket of the snow.

illustration by: Christina Mrozik

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