:тime for new Samsara. year 2012

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“Visually breathtaking. Unlike anything you will ever see.” IndieWire

“The stunning new trailer for Samsara offers a tantalizing peek at the dozens of exotic locations visited by the filmmakers in their quest to capture the ‘ever turning wheel of life’ on Earth.”

If you are familiar with the stunning and transcendent visual poetry of Ron Fricke’s non-narrative documentary BARAKA (1992), his follow up film SAMSARA might interest you as well!  He filmed everything with 70mm film so I will no doubt be gorgeous.  I would write more about this, but part of the magic of Fricke’s films are that they have to be seen and experienced, and preferably in a giant theatre.  Here is the trailer.

A spiritual love-story set in the majestic landscape of Ladakh, Himalayas. Samsara is a quest; one man’s struggle to find spiritual Enlightenment by renouncing the world. And one woman’s struggle to keep her enlightened love and life in the world. But their destiny turns, twists and comes to a surprise ending.

Release date August 23, 2012. Samsara – Filmed over a period of five years in twenty-five countries on five continents, and shot on 70mm film, Samsara transports us to the varied worlds of sacred grounds, disaster zones, industrial complexes, and natural wonders. “Samsara” is a sanskrit word meaning “continuous flow”; it is the repeating cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth (reincarnation) within Hinduism, Buddhism, Bön, Jainism, Yoga and Sikhism.

SAMSARA is a Sanskrit word that means “the ever turning wheel of life” and is the point of departure for the filmmakers as they search for the elusive current of interconnection that runs through our lives.  Filmed over a period of almost five years and in twenty-five countries, SAMSARA transports us to sacred grounds, disaster zones, industrial sites, and natural wonders.  By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, SAMSARA subverts our expectations of a traditional documentary, instead encouraging our own inner interpretations inspired by images and music that infuses the ancient with the modern.

:I, Pet Goat II, indeed an esoteric symbolism

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A story about the fire at the heart of suffering. Bringing together dancers, musicians, visual artists and 3d animators, the film takes a critical look at the events of the past decade that have shaped our world. Heliofant is an independent animation studio based in Montreal. These seek to create films and experimental works very sensitive. Their first film I, II pet goat is a perfect example. 7 minutes of splendid animation illustrating with great sadness the image of fire that burns in the heart of suffering. To watch and share.

“I, Pet Goat II” is a computer animated video that is loaded with silent messages and esoteric symbolism. While the movie has no dialogue, each symbol tells a piece of a story that covers the fields of history, politics, occult conspiracies and spirituality. 

Produced by the Canadian production crew Heliofant, I, Pet Goat II is a short animated movie that quickly went viral across the internet. Praised for its visual feats and its interesting imagery, the video however left many puzzled about the meaning of its symbolism. Politics, conspiracies and false flag operations are mixed with esoteric spirituality and occult symbolism in one big mesmerizing mind bender. Here’s the video.

After watching the video, many might say something like “What the hell did I just watch?”. The story is somewhat non-linear and there are many cryptic and enigmatic elements in the movie. I won’t claim to fully decode every single symbol-filled frame of the video, but many of the messages are easily understandable due to rather heavy-handed symbolism.

In general, the movie appears to be about the political and social climate of the past decade – complete with puppet Presidents, false flag terror and mind-controlling sorcerers. Then, through the following of a Christ figure, we leave all the sadness behind to enter a new, sunny era. In short, the story is about the triumph of spiritual enlightenment against the forces of darkness. Let’s look at the movie and at some of its many details.

more precise on this video [here]

In Conclusion

I, Pet Goat II has received widespread acclaim for its technical prowess and its original storytelling. Although there is no narration or dialogue, an elaborate story is delivered using the most ancient and universal language in History: Symbolism. Through symbols, the movie manages to deliver an acerbic critique of today’s Western Civilization, to describe its numerous evils and even to predict its inevitable downfall. More importantly, a thorough decoding of the movie’s symbolism reveals a powerful message of spiritual enlightenment based on ancient Mysteries. While this esoteric aspect of the movie might not be understood by many, it is at the core of the movie and is presented as the ultimate solution to the evils and corruption of today’s world. The movie’s conclusion is therefore a very personal one: Either YOU become a pet goat with a 666 bar-code on your forehead or YOU become a Christ figure with a third eye on your forehead. This notion of personal enlightenment is definitively a Gnostic one and is common to most esoteric schools of thoughts in all civilizations.

Agreeing or disagreeing with the movie’s spiritual conclusion is a question of personal beliefs, but it is nevertheless obvious that those behind I, Pet Goat II are “in the know” about all things occult, esoteric and even conspiratorial. Each scene has a profound underlying story behind it – whether it be historical, political or spiritual – that would take pages and pages of words to thoroughly explain. Therein lie the power of symbols: They can simply be admired for their aesthetic beauty or they can, when fully understood, reveal a profound story about humanity, God and everything in between.

#cinema – tell me about it! [December 28]

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:as u can read in my small bio here I already mention that I’m pretty much interested in film and cinema and have d small experience behind with few docs & experimental movies. my projects also as projects of bigger film directors then me as part of d team. seven years already I’m part of d Tiberiopolian FILM Alliance – Institute for Shorts & Docs [btw the call is open u can sent ur movies] and have been visiting film festivals and projection that are for respect in every way.

but, why do I write this post today, even u can be a film maker if u start using ur mobile camera, really there are festival for mobile movies.. but d point is that, Today is d International Day of Cinema, yes December, 28.

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“Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.” – Ingmar Bergman

Cinema! Can you imagine your life without movies? In March, 1895 the brothers Lumiere presented Cinematograph – a new device for showing films and got a patent for it. But the first open display happened on December 28 of the same year and this date is considered as the birthday of the cinema. This remarkable event was held in the Parisian cafe in Parkway Kaputsinov, where Lumieres presented the first short-footage movie “Arrival of a train on station La Sota” to the general public (not for free, it was the first film shown to people for money). This performance caused panic – spectators were frightened, that a train will crush them. The entrance fee to the historic film screening was 1 franc. 35 tickets were reportedly purchased. Each film was 17 meters long, which, when hand cranked through a projector, ran approximately 50 seconds. From that moment, regular film screenings began, accompanied by a piano or a saxophone. The motion pictures were sometimes also accompanied by text below the images. Modern technologies increased the quality of the films and different effects much.

“This is the best thing we can do. And we are proud of it”, said the Lumiиre brothers of their invention.

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regular old cinema photo from internet

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.sometimes we just need to celebrate d things from d past how we’ll open space for new celebrations.. for new project, movies, festivals. In Macedonia d cinema history start with Manaki Brothers, primary artist that start d experience with photography in that time, but beside the work in their photo-studio and shooting with their photo and film Camera 300, the Manaki brothers were also showing films. The first film in their new Cinema “Manaki” under open sky in “Wide Street” was held in 1921. The “Cinema Garden” was a temporary solution that did not satisfy the brothers. They later built a Cinema House and the first projection there, was on the first of December 1923. The Cinema worked with variable success. It changed owners, but in 1939 burnt to ashes…
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On December 28, 1885, the Lumière brothers, Auguste and Louis, presented their ten short documentaries/actualities, less than a minute long each, for the public consideration for the first time. Since then much has changed. Cinema stopped being silent. Filmmakers started creating colored pictures. Actors became recognizable and admired. Nickelodeons transformed into picture palaces.
In 1985, the audience paid for such kind of entertainment for the very first time. In 1927, the world saw (and listened to) the first talkie ‘The Jazz Singer’ by Michael Curtiz. The same year the first Academy Awards honored ‘Wings’ with the title of the Best Picture. In 1928, Walt Disney created Mickey Mouse. Concerning the Oscars, 1935 was marked by Frank Capra’s ‘It Happened One Night’ being first to win the grand slam. In 1975, Steven Spielberg directed the so-called first blockbuster ‘Jaws’. In 1995, Pixar and Walt Disney Pictures made the first completely computer-generated full-length feature film ‘Toy Story’. In 2009, Jim Cameron gave us a ticket to wonderful Pandora in incredible quality 3D, and Kathryn Bigelow proved that women can also be great directors.
So many dates and turning points are omitted here, but what is more important is what cinema has done for us: it influenced and inspired us, it brought us together, it made us think. Although many people believe it’s just an industry to mop up money, the silver screen remains one of the most beautiful, versatile and unbelievable arts.
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.I know that you share my passion for it, that’s why ~
:Happy International Day of Cinema!
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