September 29, 2012 marks the second annual 100 Thousand Poets for Change #100Tpc

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:

Three Girls Media & Marketing Inc.

(408) 871-0377

Emily Sidley, emilysidley@threegirlsmedia.com

Kate Barton, katebarton@threegirlsmedia.com

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Second Annual Worldwide Event

Includes Musicians and Poets Striving for Global Change

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This Year’s 100 Thousand Poets for Change Adds Musicians;

600 Events Planned in More Than 110 Countries

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Santa Rosa, Calif. (July XX, 2012) – September 29, 2012 marks the second annual 100 Thousand Poets for Change, an event that brings poets, artists and musicians (new this year) around the world together to call for environmental, social, and political change. Voices will be heard globally through concerts, readings, workshops, flash mobs and demonstrations that each focus on their specific area of concern, within the framework of peace and sustainability, such as war, ecocide, racism and censorship.

“Peace and sustainability is a major concern worldwide, and the guiding principle for this global event,” said Michael Rothenberg, Co-Founder of 100 Thousand Poets for Change. “It’s amazing to see how many people have joined in around the world to speak out for causes they believe in, and to see so much heart and creativity expressed in their diverse approaches to this event.”

Participants are hoping, through their actions and events, to seize and redirect the political and social dialogue of the day and turn the narrative of civilization towards peace and sustainability. Those that want to get involved can visit www.100tpc.com to find or plan an event near them.

“This grass roots movement has arisen largely due to the impact of social media,” said Co-Founder Terri Carrion. “We’re really excited about the events we’ve got planned this year.”

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There are hundreds of activities planned in the United States alone, including:

  • ·A blues festival in New Orleans to help raise funds for medical care for aging musicians
  • ·A concert of Tibetan music and poetry hosted by 100 TPC Free Tibet in Pasadena
  • ·A concert in Nashville’s Centennial Park featuring major local musicians
  • ·An Occupy Wall Street poetry group will kickoff a weekend of events in New York City
  • ·An all day festival with multiple stages and over 50 poetry readings hosted by Beyond Baroque Cultural Center in Los Angeles
  • ·A three-day event in Santa Rosa (near San Francisco) that will live-stream events from around the world and feature live poetry readings, workshops and various styles of music and dance including hip hop, flamenco, African drums, reggae and more (more info in the “What Else” section below)
  • ·A 2 months (August & September) warm up readings all around Macedonia, covered cities as Tetovo, Kumanovo, Skopje, Shtip, Bitola.. and many more. Video poetry, acoustic music with readings, and the main event on 29 September, 2012 that will took place in Strumica [as last year] with workshops, projections, promotions and official poetry presentations with most of the important poets in the Macedonian nowadays, or lets say in the contemporary literature history in Macedonia.

Poetry and peace gatherings are also planned in strife-torn countries like Syria and Afghanistan as well. In Cairo and Alexandria, Egypt, poets, musicians and mimes will perform in public spaces and theaters. In Kingston, Jamaica an entire week of concerts, spoken word performances, lectures and workshops will address literacy issues in the country.

100 Thousand Poets for Change began in Sonoma County, Calif. The headquarters’ event will take place at the Arlene Francis Center in downtown Santa Rosa and will feature live poetry readings, workshops and various styles of music and dance including hip hop, flamenco, African drums, reggae and more. The event will also live-stream other 100 Thousand Poets for Change events worldwide and is sponsored by the Peace & Justice Center and Sonoma County Arts Council.

Immediately following September 29th, all documentation on the 100TPC.org website will be preserved by Stanford University in California, which recognized 100 Thousand Poets for Change in 2011 as an historical event, the largest poetry reading in history. They will continue to archive the complete contents of the website, 100TPC.org, as part of their digital archiving program LOCKSS.

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About 100 Thousand Poets for Change

Co-Founder Michael Rothenberg (walterblue@bigbridge.org) is a widely known poet, editor of the online literary magazine Bigbridge.org and an environmental activist based in Northern California. Co-Founder Terri Carrion is a poet, translator, photographer, and editor and visual designer for BigBridge.org

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100 Thousand Poets for Change

P.O. Box 870

Guerneville, Ca 95446

Phone: 305-753-4569

www.100TPC.org

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#cinema – tell me about it! [December 28]

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:as u can read in my small bio here I already mention that I’m pretty much interested in film and cinema and have d small experience behind with few docs & experimental movies. my projects also as projects of bigger film directors then me as part of d team. seven years already I’m part of d Tiberiopolian FILM Alliance – Institute for Shorts & Docs [btw the call is open u can sent ur movies] and have been visiting film festivals and projection that are for respect in every way.

but, why do I write this post today, even u can be a film maker if u start using ur mobile camera, really there are festival for mobile movies.. but d point is that, Today is d International Day of Cinema, yes December, 28.

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“Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.” – Ingmar Bergman

Cinema! Can you imagine your life without movies? In March, 1895 the brothers Lumiere presented Cinematograph – a new device for showing films and got a patent for it. But the first open display happened on December 28 of the same year and this date is considered as the birthday of the cinema. This remarkable event was held in the Parisian cafe in Parkway Kaputsinov, where Lumieres presented the first short-footage movie “Arrival of a train on station La Sota” to the general public (not for free, it was the first film shown to people for money). This performance caused panic – spectators were frightened, that a train will crush them. The entrance fee to the historic film screening was 1 franc. 35 tickets were reportedly purchased. Each film was 17 meters long, which, when hand cranked through a projector, ran approximately 50 seconds. From that moment, regular film screenings began, accompanied by a piano or a saxophone. The motion pictures were sometimes also accompanied by text below the images. Modern technologies increased the quality of the films and different effects much.

“This is the best thing we can do. And we are proud of it”, said the Lumiиre brothers of their invention.

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regular old cinema photo from internet

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.sometimes we just need to celebrate d things from d past how we’ll open space for new celebrations.. for new project, movies, festivals. In Macedonia d cinema history start with Manaki Brothers, primary artist that start d experience with photography in that time, but beside the work in their photo-studio and shooting with their photo and film Camera 300, the Manaki brothers were also showing films. The first film in their new Cinema “Manaki” under open sky in “Wide Street” was held in 1921. The “Cinema Garden” was a temporary solution that did not satisfy the brothers. They later built a Cinema House and the first projection there, was on the first of December 1923. The Cinema worked with variable success. It changed owners, but in 1939 burnt to ashes…
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On December 28, 1885, the Lumière brothers, Auguste and Louis, presented their ten short documentaries/actualities, less than a minute long each, for the public consideration for the first time. Since then much has changed. Cinema stopped being silent. Filmmakers started creating colored pictures. Actors became recognizable and admired. Nickelodeons transformed into picture palaces.
In 1985, the audience paid for such kind of entertainment for the very first time. In 1927, the world saw (and listened to) the first talkie ‘The Jazz Singer’ by Michael Curtiz. The same year the first Academy Awards honored ‘Wings’ with the title of the Best Picture. In 1928, Walt Disney created Mickey Mouse. Concerning the Oscars, 1935 was marked by Frank Capra’s ‘It Happened One Night’ being first to win the grand slam. In 1975, Steven Spielberg directed the so-called first blockbuster ‘Jaws’. In 1995, Pixar and Walt Disney Pictures made the first completely computer-generated full-length feature film ‘Toy Story’. In 2009, Jim Cameron gave us a ticket to wonderful Pandora in incredible quality 3D, and Kathryn Bigelow proved that women can also be great directors.
So many dates and turning points are omitted here, but what is more important is what cinema has done for us: it influenced and inspired us, it brought us together, it made us think. Although many people believe it’s just an industry to mop up money, the silver screen remains one of the most beautiful, versatile and unbelievable arts.
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.I know that you share my passion for it, that’s why ~
:Happy International Day of Cinema!
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