#blogging – [spiritual] thing we do before new year?!

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.are u a blogger? do u blog often? when was d first time when u hear about blog? even that I can say that is more then decade, I will just try to make d frame of my 10 years experience in blogging. u know it’s not easy to be constant, to be interesting, to be with d right content in d right time? I’ve never been so into it, but u know, years are passing…

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I look in this blog and I see that this year was totally out for my blogging “in English”. I open this blog few years ago because I was thinking that I’ll have much more free time, and I’ll just share what I think is new and attractive, what can be viral and popular. I hit d button once when I wrote article about woodkid. I know that this music is great and that he will be popular very soon. that’s like it was!

I didn’t wrote article about zaz, but when I saw her in Paris 4 years ago somehow I had that feeling when u are aware that there is star in front of u. I try(ed) to share earlier here things that are important for me, d way of living, d way of believing, d way of acting…

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are u active citizen? are u part of ur civil community? are u pushing for changes in ur area, in ur home place or wherever u are? hard times are coming, nobody cares about nobody, capitalism, consumerism, corruption. on d other side poverty, violence, minorities.. what are we doing actually? we are blogging about that? really?! so awesome! c’mon people, it’s 21 century and all we are sharing on d social media is what we eat, where we’re having fun, what is our favorite pet, plus 10 cats & 10 dogs for free, because they look cute, yea.

.I must share this old story with u, somehow I think that is really necessary to repeat d things that we know and we count them as important for ur life:

An old man and his grandson are sitting by the fire outside the tepee, wrapped in furs and gazing into the leaping flames. High on a snowy ridge, a wolf howls at the moon and another answers from far away. Soon after, the old man removes the pipe from his mouth.
‘Grandson,’ he says. ‘There are two wolves inside you. One is white and the other is black.’
‘What are they doing there, Grandfather?’ asks the wide-eyed boy.
‘They are fighting each other,’ says the old man.
The boy considers this, then asks, ‘Why are they white and black?’
‘The white one is your love, your peace and your truth. The black one is your fear, your anger and your lies.’
The fire crackles and sparks flare in the night. The wolf on the ridge howls again and the old man puffs contentedly on his pipe.
Finally, the boy says, ‘Which one will win, Grandfather?’
‘Ah,’ says the old man, removing the pipe once more. ‘The one that wins is the one that you feed.’

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:being person that will show some new perspective to d circle of people that are close to u is harder then ever. nobody listen, nobody cares, I write this not because someone will read it, I write this just because now I’m alone and I think it’s time for me “again” to face d situation and “try” to accept it as it is. for me ignorance and acceptance are not d real answer, I can swallow whatever d media have to offer to me, but I don’t trust, I don’t trust my neighbors, I don’t trust my cousins, my government… why should I? we have to push harder if we want to see anything from that what we’re dreaming about when we were kids. we have d power to control how we’re vibrating, positively or negatively. therefore, the ability to bring whatever we want to our life is our right, if we are aware about that. we have d power to create our own wonderful reality, with faith that d universe is on our side – but for that we need to be more active. and when I mean more active I think about offline activism, when we are doing d things that we know about. when we meet people that we are sure they know what we are talking about. d new era brings new challenges. everyone that stops on our road is important. we listen and we don’t speak a lot, but we select what we say loud. it’s message, either for us, either for d listener.

:what if u could find
d nature of reality in a work of fiction?

.we no longer have to be a passive spectators or victims of uncontrollable circumstances around us. we no longer have to reactively live a life of randomness and worry. we no longer have to hope or wonder if everything is going to turn out okay, instead, we can develop into an active creators — an inventors of thoughts, feelings and positive energy that will elevate our state of being. we need to have faith that, whatever our face experiences, we’re gaining wisdom and d tools are bringing us closer and closer to our goals.

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.are u a #leader? do u want to be one? what do u know about leaders. are u d change that u want to see in d world? what are u doing? what is ur work? do u trust urself? do u believe to urself? are u sure that u’re doing d right steps? where u see urself in (close) future? is it correct place for u? what is ur mission? are u happy? do u know what is love? eternal existence of ur soul? are u transcendental?

keep d struggle, answer those questions every time when they come inside ur mind, be d bird, no, be d person that will release ur bird from d cage.

new year is coming, d bells will bring d new beginning very soon. till next time – stay blessed friends!

:peace, love, unity, bliss and light! ❤

Lechuga

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I know that this is my first post for this year so I want to say in d begining to all of u who’re actually subscribed somehow to my news feeds HAPPY NEW YEAR & all d best in this one.

Few days ago it was old new year, traditionally we’re celebrating it with making fires etc & aside all this story I want to keep here something that I pretty much like it.

Lechuga

lechuga

When you want to encourage someone not to give up, you tell that person: “Lechuga” which is the short pronunciation of “never give up” in Spanish.

This is truly meaningful and gorgeous.

So in that manner I want to wish for all of u motivation, inspiration and good will to never give up from ur ideas, fantasies and imagination!

~ bless bless & light ~

:тime for new Samsara. year 2012

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“Visually breathtaking. Unlike anything you will ever see.” IndieWire

“The stunning new trailer for Samsara offers a tantalizing peek at the dozens of exotic locations visited by the filmmakers in their quest to capture the ‘ever turning wheel of life’ on Earth.”

If you are familiar with the stunning and transcendent visual poetry of Ron Fricke’s non-narrative documentary BARAKA (1992), his follow up film SAMSARA might interest you as well!  He filmed everything with 70mm film so I will no doubt be gorgeous.  I would write more about this, but part of the magic of Fricke’s films are that they have to be seen and experienced, and preferably in a giant theatre.  Here is the trailer.

A spiritual love-story set in the majestic landscape of Ladakh, Himalayas. Samsara is a quest; one man’s struggle to find spiritual Enlightenment by renouncing the world. And one woman’s struggle to keep her enlightened love and life in the world. But their destiny turns, twists and comes to a surprise ending.

Release date August 23, 2012. Samsara – Filmed over a period of five years in twenty-five countries on five continents, and shot on 70mm film, Samsara transports us to the varied worlds of sacred grounds, disaster zones, industrial complexes, and natural wonders. “Samsara” is a sanskrit word meaning “continuous flow”; it is the repeating cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth (reincarnation) within Hinduism, Buddhism, Bön, Jainism, Yoga and Sikhism.

SAMSARA is a Sanskrit word that means “the ever turning wheel of life” and is the point of departure for the filmmakers as they search for the elusive current of interconnection that runs through our lives.  Filmed over a period of almost five years and in twenty-five countries, SAMSARA transports us to sacred grounds, disaster zones, industrial sites, and natural wonders.  By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, SAMSARA subverts our expectations of a traditional documentary, instead encouraging our own inner interpretations inspired by images and music that infuses the ancient with the modern.

:wisdom vol.I [shortly]

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The paper is not the writing, yet it carries the writing. The ink is not the message, nor is the reader’s mind the message – but they all make the message possible.

[Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj]

Everybody wants freedom as far as talking is concerned, but nobody really is free and nobody really wants to be free, because freedom brings responsibility. It does not come alone. And to be dependent is simple: the responsibility is not on you, the responsibility is on the person you are dependent on.

So people have made a schizophrenic way of life. They talk about truth, they talk about freedom, and they live in lies, they live in slaveries – slaveries of many kinds, because each slavery frees you from some responsibility. A man who really wants to be free has to accept immense responsibilities. He cannot dump his responsibilities on anybody else. Whatever he does, whatever he is, he is responsible.

[Osho]

You must teach your children that the ground beneath their feet is the ashes of your grandfathers. So that they will respect the land, tell your children that the earth is rich with the lives of our kin.

Teach your children what we have taught our children, that the earth is our mother. Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons of the earth.

If men spit upon the ground, they spit upon themselves.
Treat the earth well. It was not given to you by your parents, it was loaned to you by your children. We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children.

[Native American Wisdoms]

There is a road in the hearts of all of us, hidden and seldom traveled, which leads to an unknown, secret place. The old people came literally to love the soil, and they sat or reclined on the ground with a feeling of being close to a mothering power. Their teepees were built upon the earth and their altars were made of earth. The soul was soothing, strengthening, cleansing and healing. That is why the old Indian still sits upon the earth instead of propping himself up and away from its life giving forces. For him, to sit or lie upon the ground is to be able to think more deeply and to feel more keenly. He can see more clearly into the mysteries of life and come closer in kinship to other lives about him.

[Chief Luther Standing Bear]

:what is d Universal #Truth

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Higher frequency energies being transmitted by the forces of light onto this planet allow individuals that are open to receive (through opening their beliefs and mindset) to activate their higher Chakras (7 to 15), which opens their central channels (Universal Kundalini), raise their frequency and DNA between NOW (2011) and December 2012. These activations help bypass the restriction programs being activated on this planet.

via: Klaus Wallbrunn

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Why has this universal truth been hidden from the beings on this planet?

This is the biggest mystery. For over 25,000 years the Universal Truth was not available to the people of this planetary system. It is now finally being received on this planet. Deep seekers of the truth that are open minded and ready will receive it.

The higher energies of 2012 and beyond have a two fold effect. We have been stuck in a Universal Time Matrix System that has been disconnected from the higher dimension frequencies for thousands of years. Ancient Earth history shows manipulations of the planetary grids by beings from other more advanced systems (Draco-Orion, Sirius, Pleiades).

:d universal solvent _by justin totemical

The Universal Time Matrix system we are in is being manipulated. The energies of 2012 and beyond are opportunities for faster ascension and manipulation into restriction of ascension.

“Higher frequency energies being transmitted by the forces of light onto this planet allow individuals that are open to receive (through opening their beliefs and mindset) to activate their higher Chakras (7 to 15), which opens their central channels (Universal Kundalini), raise their frequency and DNA between NOW (2011) and December 2012.”

These activations help bypass the restriction programs being activated on this planet. The restriction program energies get activated in March 2011 (force field of energy that restricts human ascension process) and is planned to go full force in December 2012. Those that do not raise their frequencies will fall into these energies and will not be able to ascend to the higher dimensions (beyond dimension 11.5). The DNA of most people on this planet has already been mutated. That is why only 3-5 DNA strands are active instead of the 12-48 DNA strands (which used to be the norm for angelic human race).”

This is hard to believe. There is a lot going on in this planetary system that people are not being made aware of.

IT IS TIME TO WAKE UP AND REALIZE THE HIGHER TRUTH OF WHAT IS GOING ON.

~sacred knowledge of vibration and the power of human emotions~

:a sense of wonder

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Interview with Ernesto Sábato

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:what I really like in my facebook friends, d real ones that I’ve met in Real too is that some of them are perfect sources for information.  I like d content that my friend Slobodan Nikolic [Serbian poet] shares on his profile and is connect with literature cause not very rare he wants to play some games on net. I’m sure that he’ll not share it on some other place/ blog or smt and cause it’s not my first time to steal from his content  [Sumatra and d explanation of Sumatra] I decide that this is d right place for this interview.  🙂

:before he close his profile early in d day [hopefuly shortly] he shared this amazing interview from 1990 that I find pretty interesting for me and for my blog (readers) so voila’ if u’re one of them EnJoy! [1ox Slobo’]

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:a sense of wonder

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.Q: You  have  written  many  essays, notably  a  collection entitled Hombres y Engranajes  (1951;”Men and Gears”), on the dehumanizing  effects of science and  technology. How  did  a scientist like  yourself come to see things in this light?

A: Although I studied physics and mathematics, disciplines which  offered me a kind of abstract and ideal refuge in a “platonic paradise” far from the chaos of the world, I soon realized that the blind faith that some scientists have in “pure” thought, in reason and in Progress (usually with a capital “P“) made them overlook and even despise such essential aspects of human life as the unconscious and the myths which lie at the origin of artistic expression, in short, the “hidden” side of human nature. All that was missing in my purely scientific work – the Mr. Hyde that every Dr. Jekyll  needs if he is to be a complete individual – I found in German  romanticism  and, above all, in existentialism and surrealism. Lifting my eyes from my logarithms and sinusoids, I looked on the human face, from which I have never since looked away.

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Q: Some great contemporary  writers have managed to reconcile science and  creativity…

A: That may be so, but it does not lessen my belief that our era is strongly marked by the opposition between science and the humanities, which today has become irreconcilable. Since the Enlightenment  and the days of the Encyclopaedists, and above all since the advent of positivism, science has withdrawn to a kind of Olympian retreat, cut off from humanity. The absolute sovereignty of Science and Progress over the greater part of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has reduced the individual to the status of a cog in a gigantic machine. Capitalist and Marxist theorists alike have contributed to the propagation of this sadly distorted vision in which the individual is melted into the mass and the mystery of the soul is reduced to physically quantifiable emissions of radiation.

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Q: Yet,  even  in  the  nineteenth  century, there was a strong philosophical current that  questioned the  monumental rational edifice constructed by Hegel, the weight of which crushed the individual. We are thinking  of Kierkegaard, about whom  you have written extensively.

A: Kierkegaard was the first thinker to question whether science should take precedence over life and to answer firmly that life comes first. Since then, the object deified by science has been dislodged as the centre of the universe and been replaced  by  the  subject, the man of flesh and blood. This led on to Karl Jaspers and Martin Heidegger, to twentieth century existentialist philosophy in which man is no longer an “impartial” scientific observer but a “self” clothed in flesh, the “being destined to die” of whom I have written and who is the source of tragedy and  metaphysics, the highest forms of literary expression.

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Q: But not the only ones…

A: Of  course not,  but  to my  mind  they  are the most important  because of their tragic, transcendental dimension. One  has only  to think  of Dostoyevsky’s Notes from the Underground, that bloody diatribe in which, with almost demented  hatred, he denounced  the modern age and its cult of progress.

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Q: We are right into literature now…

A: Yes, because the novel can express things that are beyond the scope of philosophy or the essay such as our darkest uncertainties about God, destiny, the meaning of life, hope. The novel answers all these questions, not simply by expressing ideas, but through myth and symbol, by drawing on the magical properties of thought. All the same, many of the characters in novels are just as real as reality itself. Is Don Quixote “unreal”? If reality bears any relationship to durability, then this character born of Cervantes’ imagination is much more real than the objects that surround  us, for he is immortal.

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Q: So literature interprets reality?

A: Fortunately, art  and  poetry  have  never claimed to dissociate the rationaf from the irrational, the sensibility from the intellect, dream from reality. Dream, mythology and art have a common  source in the unconscious – they reveal a world which could have no other form of expression. It is absurd to ask artists to explain their work. Can you imagine Beethoven analysing his symphonies or Kafka explaining  what  he really  meant  in The Trial? The notion that everything can be “rationally”  explained is the hallmark of the Western positivist mentality typical of the modern age, an age which overestimates the value of science, reason and logic. Yet this form of culture represents only a brief moment in human history.

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Q: You  seem to consider our age to be the final phase in a line of modem thought beginning in the middle of the nineteenth century and ending in our own times.

A: Literary fashions should not be confused with the major trends of thought. In the vast and tragic movement of ideas there are advances and retreats, sideways excursions and counter-currents. It is clear, however, that we are witnessing the end of an era. We are living through a crisis of civilization in which there is a kind of confrontation between the eternal forces of passion and order, of pathos and ethos, of the Dionysian and the Apollonian.

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Q: Can this crisis be resolved?

A: The only way we can escape from this harrowing crisis is by snatching living, suffering man from the gigantic machine in which he is enmeshed and which is crushing him. But it must not be forgotten, at the dawn of a new millennium, that an age does not end at the same moment for everyone. In the nineteenth century, when Progress was triumphant, writers and thinkers such as Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard were not “of their time”, for already, despite the optimism of scientists, they had a presentiment of the catastrophe that was in store for us and which Kafka, Sartre and Camus were to portray.

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Q: Is that why  you reject the concept of ”progress” in art?

A: Art can no more progress than a dream can, and for the same reasons. Are the nightmares of our contemporaries any more advanced than those of the prophets of the Bible? We can say that Einstein’s mathematics are superior to those of Archimedes, but not that Joyce’s Ulysses is superior  to Homer’s Odyssey. One of Proust’s characters is convinced that Debussy is a better composer than Beethoven for the simple reason that he was born after him. There’s no need to be a musicologist   to appreciate Proust’s satirical irony in this passage. Every artist aspires towards  what may be called an absolute, or towards a fragment of the Absolute, with a capital “A”,  whether he be an Egyptian sculptor in the time of Ramses II, a Greek  artist of the classical age, or Donatello. This is why there is no progress in art, only change and new departures that are due not only to the sensibilities of each artist but also to the tacit or explicit vision of an epoch or a culture.  One  thing at least is certain; no arust is better placed than another to attain these absolute values simply  because he was born later.

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Q: So you do not believe that there can be a universal aesthetic?

A: The  relativity  of  history  is  reflected  in  aesthetics. Each period has a dominant value – religious,  economic or metaphysical – which colours all the others. In the eyes of the people of a religious culture preoccupied with the eternal, Ramses II’s hieratic and geometric colossus would encapsu­ late more “truth”  than  a totally  realistic statue. History shows us that beauty and truth change from one period to the next, that black culture and white culture are based on different criteria. The reputations of writers, artists and musicians are subject to swings of the pendulum.

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Q: There is no justification, therefore, for speaking of the superiority of one culture over another?

A: Today we have come a long way from conceited positivist certainties and from “enlightened  thought” in general. Following the work of Levy-Bruhl, who after forty years of research admitted in all honesty that he could see no “progression”  in  the  move from  magical to logical thought and that the two had inevitably to coexist in man, all cultures must be seen as deserving equal respect. We have finally come round to rendering justice to what were once condescendingly called “primitive cultures”.

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Q: You  are, nevertheless, dissatisfied with  the  education currently available  in  schools and universities. What do you think it lacks?

A: When I was young, I was made to swallow a mountain of facts that I forgot as quickly as I could. In geography, for example, I barely remember the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn, and perhaps that’s only because they are often mentioned in the newspapers. Someone once said that culture is what is left when you have forgotten everything else. For a human being, learning means taking part, discovering and inventing. If people are to advance, they must form their own opinions, even if, at times, this means making mistakes and having to go back to the beginning again. They need to explore new paths and experiment with new methods. Otherwise we shall, at best, merely produce a race of scholars or, at worst, of bookworms or of parrots regurgitating ready-made phrases from books. The book is a wonderful tool, provided that it does not become an obstacle that prevents us from pursuing our own research.

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Q: How do you see the educator’s role?

A: Etymologically speaking, to educate means to develop, to bring out what exists in embryonic  form, to realize potential. This “labour”, this delivery by the teacher is rarely fully accomplished, and this perhaps is the origin of all the faults of our education systems. Students must be made to ask themselves questions, and be convinced of their own ignorance and of ours, so that they are prepared not only to ask questions but to think  for themselves, even if they disagree with us. It is also very important  for them to be able to make mistakes and for us to accept questions and approaches that may seem odd. Given this state of mind, students will understand that reality is infinitely more complex and mysterious than the small area encompassed by our knowledge. Everything  else will follow automatically.  This is what  gives rise to questionings and to certainties, the mixture of tradition and innovation that constitutes the cultural dynamic. As Kant said, people should not be taught philosophy, they should be taught to philosophize. This is the method of Plato’s “Dialogues”, based on direct, spontaneous exchange, in the course of which questions emerge from our awareness of our fundamental ignorance.

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Q: Can  you give us a specific example?

A: A long time ago, I traveled through Patagonia in a jeep with  a forester  who  told  me  how  much  the  forest  was receding with each successive forest fire. He told me of the defensive role played by cypress trees, which he compared to the stoical heroes of an army rearguard since they sacrifice themselves to delay the spread of a fire and to protect the other  trees. This  made  me wonder  what  the teaching of geography could be like if it were linked to the struggle between species, the conquest of the oceans and of the continents, and to the history of mankind, which is pathetically dependent upon the terrestrial environment. In this way the pupil would get the idea of a true adventure, of a thrilling battle against the hostile forces of Nature and of history. Far from the dead weight of encyclopaedic knowledge, from dusty  volumes  and  ready-made ideas, knowledge  thus perpetually renewed would give each  pupil  the feeling of discovering  and  participating   in  an  age-old  story. For example, to engrave indelibly on students’ minds the complicated geography of the American continent,  as a lived­ through rather than a book-learned experience, would not the best way be to teach it through the adventures of great explorers such as Magellan or conquistadores such as Cortes? We should be formed, not informed. As Montaigne said, “Learning by heart is not learning”. What an exciting manual of geography and ethnology for teenagers Jules Verne’s Around  the World in Eighty Days would make! We have to kindle astonishment at the profound mysteries of the universe. Everything in the universe is astonishing if you think about it. But familiarity has made us blasé and nothing astonishes us any more. We have to rediscover a sense of wonder.

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Q: You even recommend “back to  front” teaching, starting with the present and reaching back into the past.

A: I believe that the best way to interest young people in literature is to start with contemporary authors, whose language and concerns are closer to the students’ own hopes and fears. Only later can they really become interested in what Homer or Cervantes wrote about love and death, hope and despair, solitude and heroism. The same could be done with  history  by tracing  back  to the  roots  of current problems. It is also a mistake to try to teach everything. Only a few key episodes and problems, enough to provide a structure, should be taught. Few books should be used, but they should be read with passion. This is the only way to avoid making reading seem like a walk through  a cemetery of dead words.  Reading  is only valid if it strikes a chord in the reader’s mind. There is a kind of pseudo-encyclopaedic teaching, invariably associated with book-learning, which is a form of death. As if there were no culture  before Gutenberg!

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Q: For years you have been pointing out the risks inherent in nuclear weapons, in the arms race and in ideological confrontation throughout the world. Aren’t the upheavals of recent years, and in particular of recent months, taking some of the  force out of this message?

A: I’m not so sure about that. First of all, the proliferation of nuclear weapons is a fact. Many countries already have their own atomic “mini-bombs” and a chain reaction starting with some irresponsible terrorist action cannot be discounted. But this is only the purely “physical”  aspect of the question,  monstrous though it is. What really worries me is the spiritual catastrophe facing our era, which is the sad outcome of the repression of the forces of the unconscious in contemporary society. I see evidence of this in the proliferation of all kinds of protesting minorities, as well as in our collective history. We live in an anguished, neurotic, unstable age, hence the frequency of psychosomatic disorders, the upsurge in violence and in the use of drugs. This is a philosophical rather than a police matter. Until quite recently the “peripheral” regions of the world were unaffected by this phenomenon. In the East for example, as  well  as  in Africa and in Oceania, mythological and philosophical traditions maintained a certain harmony between man and the world. The abrupt, unchecked irruption of Western values and technology has wreaked havoc, just as, during the Industrial Revolution, the mill-owners of Manchester swamped with their cheap cotton goods peoples who knew how to produce exquisite textiles. This mental catastrophe  is leading us towards a terrifying psychological and spiritual explosion which will give rise to a wave of suicides and scenes of hysteria and collective madness. Ancient  traditions  cannot  be replaced by the transistor industry.

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Q: Do you see nothing  positive in the balance-sheet?

A: Yes, perhaps, but frankly I suspect that I belong to a race that is on the road to extinction. I believe in art, dialogue, liberty and the dignity of the individual human being.  But  who is  interested in such  nonsense today? Dialogue has given way to insult and liberty to political prisons. What difference is there between a left-wing and a right-wing police state? As if there could be good or bad torturers!  I must be a reactionary because I still believe in dull, mediocre democracy, the only regime which, after all, allows one to think freely and to prepare the way for a better reality.

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Interview with Ernesto Sábato: A Sense Of Wonder, The UNESCO Courier, August 1990

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